Moving On, Embracing Change

          July 25, 2014 was a blessed day as we celebrated the move to our new DIS/Second Mom campus at J. Cruz St. Barangay Ugong, Pasig City. Our ceremonial blessing was led by DIS president Joel Banal and DIS Directress Jenny Mapua-Banal, and was graced by the presence of Department of Education Secretary Bro. Armin Luistro, TAO Corporation President and Founder Mr. Jun Sy, Jr., The Light of Jesus Family Founder Bro. Bo Sanchez, Congressman Roman Romulo, Mayor Maribel Eusebio, and highly acclaimed singer and composer Mr. Noel Cabangon. The event could not have been complete without the presence of our DIS/Second Mom parents who have transitioned with us, and continue to grow with us through this change.

 blessing

          What an exciting time for all of us! Those who have visited us during the 4-month school break have seen the ongoing construction, shared our anticipation, encouraged us despite challenges, appreciated what has been accomplished, and looked forward to what is yet to unfold.

               new campus

Missing our old site is natural for our students who have grown to love our home of 14 years, but we are continuously growing together, walking through the pains of leaving something familiar, and gearing towards the hope of making new memories.

new classroom

Aside from moving to new locations, your children will continue to face different transitions in life. Here are some ways we can help them cope with change:

  1. Acknowledge their anxieties. It can be fearful and worrisome for a child to be in an unfamiliar environment, to meet new people, or to exchange old routines for new ones (even for adults!). Assure them that their fears are valid. Allow them to talk. Listen. Phrases like, “I know how scary it can be,” “I feel sad too when things change,” or “Yes, it is hard,” let them know you understand what they are dealing with. Sometimes there are no answers required. Being there for them and giving them a hug can make change less daunting.
  2. Stay positive. Cite new things they can look forward to. You may also give examples of changes in your life and what made them exciting for you. Have confidence that they can hurdle the change. Your positive attitude will rub off on them.
  3. Keep household routines. Too much change around them may be overwhelming for children. If they have a routine at home or a schedule of family activities, maintain its regularity.
  4. Allow them to choose. What children may find difficult about change is their lack of control over things that happen around them. Give them the ability to decide on certain things – for ex. Clothes to wear, color of their socks, books to read from your bookshelf, school snacks (as long as they’re healthy!), etc. Presenting options, especially to the little ones, may aid in their decision-making.
  5. Communicate with teachers. Let the teacher know if your child is going through any kind of change. This will help your child’s teacher understand classroom behavior as well as communicate more effectively with your child who is facing a challenging situation.
  6. Ensure proper food, enough exercise and rest. A child who lacks the right nutrients and is physically unfit will have trouble dealing with the emotional and mental stress of change. Make sure your child eats well, gets enough exercise and outdoor play, and at least 9-12 hours of sleep daily.

As our students – your children – find their way into their new classrooms, break into new routines, meet new teachers, they still find comfort in familiar faces, old friends, and the same way of inquiry-based learning that makes them highly adaptable to change.

 

 

Celebrating Shakespeare

Learning Not Just for Formalities’ Sake

Here are some opportunities you may present your older children to become more comfortable and confident about themselves in a formal setting:

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Fine dining at a restaurant. Teach them the secret of working outside-in on the utensils and many more table manners and etiquette at a fine dining restaurant. Allow them to place their own orders with the waiter pleasantly and politely. The use of appropriate language, tone and volume of voice develops their communication skills in a formal set-up. Help them to choose the proper attire for the evening without being underdressed or going overboard. A cute bowtie for boys or a snazzy purse for girls may be useful confidence-boosters.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Fine dining at home with invited guests. Inviting friends over for a formal dinner at home is a fun way to learn to be a gracious host. Set the table with your children and have them toss ideas for accents like flowers, candles or place cards. The crafty ones may even make handmade tokens for their guests! Browse through different websites or simulate the art of entertaining so they feel comfortable once their guests arrive.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Formal family events. Weddings, debuts, formal reunions or other formal gatherings your children are part of are perfect opportunities to mingle with people of different ages while maintaining proper decorum. Why not let them give you a hand at organizing the event no matter how big or small a role they play? It could be taking care of invitations, a program, suggesting a theme or ushering in guests. They learn the nitty-gritties of formalities and gain a sense of accomplishment from being partly responsible for the event’s success! Acknowledgment for a job well done and for being at their best behavior always goes a long way.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Dancing the night away last February 21, 2014 for the Domuschola secondary students was much more than a Midsummer Night’s Dream. Beyond required reading and interpretation of William Shakespeare’s work in the classroom, the students wrote their own sonnets, recited them, staged a one-act play and delivered a monologue which all culminated in a whimsical cotillion dance. This experiential learning fostered in them a real understanding of the genre. Apart from the practical application of their knowledge and skills, it was also their chance to be at their best formal behavior.

Cultivating Your Child’s Social Consciousness

Cultivating Your Child’s Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

How relevant is a child’s learning to the society in which he or she belongs? Every opportunity to learn is an opportunity to make a mark. Inside our classrooms, we aim to extend acquired knowledge as far as little minds can take them. When what begins in the mind is made concrete by their hands, we see that there has been true learning.

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

How can we work together to develop our children’s social consciousness? What opens their minds to the awareness that concepts can be applied to issues concerning other children like them around the world? How do we help them believe they are big enough for their actions to create a significant dent?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Discussion of relevant social issues. Dinnertime is a good opportunity to have conversations with children about current events. They may have their own sources of gathering news from social media, television, radio or word of mouth, but your presence is key to helping them process this information in a healthy and productive manner. What are their thoughts and opinions?How do they feel about the news they hear?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Exposure to socially-oriented activities for children. Pave the way for them to be involved. Community outreach projects develop a sense of responsibility in children and concretely show them means to address issues in their own capacity. Putting their skills and talents to use is the best way to ignite their spirit of volunteerism. Can they teach younger children subjects they excel in, do arts and crafts for a cause, engage in music or sports with other children in less privileged communities? What else can they do?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Writing about their experiences and realizations.Encourage them to keep a journal about their thoughts, feelings and experiences. They make take it a step further by including ideas or plans they would like to come to fruition. Recording is one effective way of raising their consciousness by remembering. They can keep going back to what they wrote and recall their opinions and even questions they may have asked themselves. Can they answer their questions eventually? Are there more questions now? Inquiring helps give them the direction they need to find their answers.

The annual Primary Years Program (PYP) Exhibit by the Grade 5 Domuschola students is a culmination of this developed skill in understanding social concerns pertaining to the youth. The theme, “Minsan Lang Tayo Maging Bata,” lent itself to a day of sharing their understanding of the reality of child abuse, child trafficking and child labor. Through field trips, online research and interviews, the data they gathered helped them get a sense of what goes on around them outside their comfort zones.

This kind of social awareness is what we want to cultivate in our children as we work together, allowing them to see fully the role they play in the big picture.

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

Steeping tea over insightful conversations last January 23, 2014 was the first of a series of this delightful way to spend a late afternoon until early evening with the parents of our students. Pre-kinder moms and dads who participated in the re launch ofTea Time with Teacher Mom experienced sharing of best parenting practices amidst a relaxed atmosphere. See how we transformed the Music and Movement Room into a cozy Tea Shop!

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

It was a perfect time to bond with our parents – for us to get to know them more as well as for them to understand why we do the things we do in school. Doing away with the formalities and bringing a casual ambiance into the occasion allowed us to share openly and listen willingly to what each one had to say.

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

We have our own challenges with our students in school, and as parents, with our children at home. Different approaches in supporting children, giving the necessary follow through and aligning our practices in school with those at home were specified in the handouts distributed to our parents. Though adjustments may be made with varying contexts, we all agreed that this guide serves as a useful tool.

After Tea Time with Teacher Mom, here’s what some of the Pre-Kinder parents had to say:

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

“It was very helpful.  The informal set-up helped us relax and feel comfortable. We also appreciated that other parents shared their experiences and asked questions regarding best parenting practices.”

“We learned that we can discipline our children in a way that allows them to still make “directed” choices.  One of the moms even shared a pleasant behavior where the daughter said, “Excuse me, Mommy,” instead of just interrupting her conversation with another parent. She was very pleased and wondered where she learned it. Apparently, she learned it from the school.”

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

“At home, I am surprised to see how our kids react to certain situations.  They do good things that I know I wasn’t able to teach them because of my busy schedule.”

“I liked it when Teacher Mom shared her experiences in raising her kids. She used different approaches in disciplining them.”

More Than a Cup of Tea

More Than a Cup of Tea

The next round of Tea Time with Teacher Mom will be with the Kinder parents on February 20, 2014, 5:30pm.

Would this activity be your cup of tea? What topics would you like us to bring to the table? We’d love to hear from you.