Monthly Archives: May 2014

Celebrating Shakespeare

Learning Not Just for Formalities’ Sake

Here are some opportunities you may present your older children to become more comfortable and confident about themselves in a formal setting:

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Fine dining at a restaurant. Teach them the secret of working outside-in on the utensils and many more table manners and etiquette at a fine dining restaurant. Allow them to place their own orders with the waiter pleasantly and politely. The use of appropriate language, tone and volume of voice develops their communication skills in a formal set-up. Help them to choose the proper attire for the evening without being underdressed or going overboard. A cute bowtie for boys or a snazzy purse for girls may be useful confidence-boosters.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Fine dining at home with invited guests. Inviting friends over for a formal dinner at home is a fun way to learn to be a gracious host. Set the table with your children and have them toss ideas for accents like flowers, candles or place cards. The crafty ones may even make handmade tokens for their guests! Browse through different websites or simulate the art of entertaining so they feel comfortable once their guests arrive.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Formal family events. Weddings, debuts, formal reunions or other formal gatherings your children are part of are perfect opportunities to mingle with people of different ages while maintaining proper decorum. Why not let them give you a hand at organizing the event no matter how big or small a role they play? It could be taking care of invitations, a program, suggesting a theme or ushering in guests. They learn the nitty-gritties of formalities and gain a sense of accomplishment from being partly responsible for the event’s success! Acknowledgment for a job well done and for being at their best behavior always goes a long way.

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Celebrating Shakespeare: Secondary Dance

Dancing the night away last February 21, 2014 for the Domuschola secondary students was much more than a Midsummer Night’s Dream. Beyond required reading and interpretation of William Shakespeare’s work in the classroom, the students wrote their own sonnets, recited them, staged a one-act play and delivered a monologue which all culminated in a whimsical cotillion dance. This experiential learning fostered in them a real understanding of the genre. Apart from the practical application of their knowledge and skills, it was also their chance to be at their best formal behavior.

Cultivating Your Child’s Social Consciousness

Cultivating Your Child’s Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

How relevant is a child’s learning to the society in which he or she belongs? Every opportunity to learn is an opportunity to make a mark. Inside our classrooms, we aim to extend acquired knowledge as far as little minds can take them. When what begins in the mind is made concrete by their hands, we see that there has been true learning.

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

How can we work together to develop our children’s social consciousness? What opens their minds to the awareness that concepts can be applied to issues concerning other children like them around the world? How do we help them believe they are big enough for their actions to create a significant dent?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Discussion of relevant social issues. Dinnertime is a good opportunity to have conversations with children about current events. They may have their own sources of gathering news from social media, television, radio or word of mouth, but your presence is key to helping them process this information in a healthy and productive manner. What are their thoughts and opinions?How do they feel about the news they hear?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Exposure to socially-oriented activities for children. Pave the way for them to be involved. Community outreach projects develop a sense of responsibility in children and concretely show them means to address issues in their own capacity. Putting their skills and talents to use is the best way to ignite their spirit of volunteerism. Can they teach younger children subjects they excel in, do arts and crafts for a cause, engage in music or sports with other children in less privileged communities? What else can they do?

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Cultivating Social Consciousness

Writing about their experiences and realizations.Encourage them to keep a journal about their thoughts, feelings and experiences. They make take it a step further by including ideas or plans they would like to come to fruition. Recording is one effective way of raising their consciousness by remembering. They can keep going back to what they wrote and recall their opinions and even questions they may have asked themselves. Can they answer their questions eventually? Are there more questions now? Inquiring helps give them the direction they need to find their answers.

The annual Primary Years Program (PYP) Exhibit by the Grade 5 Domuschola students is a culmination of this developed skill in understanding social concerns pertaining to the youth. The theme, “Minsan Lang Tayo Maging Bata,” lent itself to a day of sharing their understanding of the reality of child abuse, child trafficking and child labor. Through field trips, online research and interviews, the data they gathered helped them get a sense of what goes on around them outside their comfort zones.

This kind of social awareness is what we want to cultivate in our children as we work together, allowing them to see fully the role they play in the big picture.